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Nintendo Power Magazine Ends After 24 Years, Last Issue This December

Radford C. Aug 22, 2012 2

Nintendo Power Magazines

Yesterday, according to an Ars Technica report, a source was claiming that following some extended difficulty working with the Nintendo team, the publisher and hardware manufacturer has decided not to renew its contract with Future Publishing, who held the rights to Nintendo Power.

Today, Nintendo confirms that the Future-published magazine is ending this year. Here’s their official statement:

Nintendo can confirm that Future US will end the production of Nintendo Power magazine with the last issue slated for December 2012. For Nintendo Power subscription inquiries, please visit nintendopower.com/customerservice. Check out Nintendo at nintendo.com, on Facebook at facebook.com/nintendo or on Twitter @nintendoamerica.

Nintendo was apparently uninterested in assuming control of the magazine, which is understandable at a time when print publications are hemorrhaging readers every month (the likewise long-running GamePro shut down last winter). It’s really unfortunate that Future Publishing and Nintendo couldn’t come to an agreement on some kind of alternate release strategy like a premium, quarterly digest.

Employees were notified last week and it’s finally making its way out to the public with Senior Editor Chris Hoffman taking to Twitter to say they’re planning something memorable with the final issue (those Tweets have subsequently been taken down), but we want to wish the best to all of the Nintendo Staff.

The magazine has come a long way over the years from a monthly marketing pamphlet to an actual tech review publication. On a personal note, between Nintendo Power, Next Gen and Video Games and Computer Entertainment (which also ended many years ago), I was able to get my video game fix during that long-ish stretch where my parents weren’t able to feed my gaming habit. Still, having a few cartridges to trade around was enough to trade games I borrowed to which I pretended to own to get more games to borrow. Ultimately, the magazine fed my love of gaming, with extensive features about upcoming releases, gorgeous art from the likes of Yoshitaka Amano, and real evangelism for home video gaming which was getting a second life thanks to Ninendo’s console.

Although I haven’t subscribed to the publication in years, it’ll be missed as I always check it out at Safeway’s newsstands.

Via »Ars Technica